About this blog

This blog is a kind of sequel to my book Man, Dog, Stroke. I’m the Man in the title. The blog is meant for anyone, of course, but may be of particular interest to those affected by stroke, whether stroke survivor or carer for a stroke survivor or a professional working with those affected by stroke. You can go to the Amazon listing for my book by clicking on the picture below. The book is also available to order through any high street bookshop.

ISBN 978-0-9570995-0-0Profits from the sale of the book are donated to The Stroke Association, a charity whose vision is of a world free from strokes and which campaigns for better services for stroke survivors. It also funds research into stroke and tries to raise awareness of stroke among the public.

And the dog? If you read the book, you will learn all about Hamish, and why he is important.  You can also read his occasional musings about life under Cave Canem above.

4 Responses to About this blog

  1. LYNDA MCWILLIAM says:

    i HAVE NOW READ THIS VERY ENTERTAINING BOOK AND BEING A PHYSIOTHERAPIST IT GIVES ME A GREAT INSIGHT INTO THE MIND OF A STROKE VICTIM.
    MY MOTHER AGED 90 RECENTLY HAD TWO STROKES AND THE LESSON TO BE LEARNED IS ….TREAT FAST AND FOR THE VICTIM …TRY HARD AS THE FIRST WEEK IS VERY IMPORTANT FOR THE END RESULT.
    THANK YOU ERIC FOR YOUR VERY ENLIGHTENING TALK TO LADIES PROBUS IN BANCHORY…..MOST ENJOYABLE AND OBVIOUSLY THOUGHT PROVOKING ACCORDING TO THE NUMBER OF POST TALK QUESTIONS
    THANKS AGAIN AND EVERYONE YOUNG AND OLD WILL BENEFIT FROM READING YOUR BOOK AND THEY MAY JUST INADVERTENTLY BE ABLE TO HELP A STROKE VICTIM
    REGARDS
    LYNDA MCWILLIAM

  2. Jon Barrick says:

    Hi Eric,
    I bought your book at the Scottish Stroke Assembly and have just finished reading it, thank you for writing it, it was a good read. Thank you also for your talk at the assembly which i very much enjopyed. Both my mum and dad had strokes, sadly neither of them are now with us, and my mum had left sided weakness.
    I have spoken with many who have survived strokes over the years and your book is one of the first that I have read that mentions the existential pain of a stroke (p51) “am i the same person post stroke as i was pre stroke”, despite this being a topic that many have talked about. Certainly this is an issue I have raised with those considering the issues of stem cell treatments, if a part of the brain is destroyed by stroke, but then it’s functions and abilities are replaced with new tissue prompted by stem cell treatment then what does this mean. The answers I usually get are about achieving new movement or function in limbs at last, or maybe the return of speech or cognitive abilities. But what about issues concerning personality, emotions,attitudes and views and so on ?
    Any way i suspect most of us will prefer to receive the stem cell treatments if and when they are developed in the future, and will deal with existential issues as a subordinate matter.
    Another comment in your book that struck home was the fact that we need to resist the notion that the National health service is the health system, full stop. With the obesity epidemic and living longer leading to an evergrowing ageing population, the number of people having strokes is going to increase. The consequence of that is the need to recognise the resources of the NHS are not infinite, and we must do more to encourage self management, and a plurality of support particularly post stroke.
    I found your book moving and stimulating, I could write more but I don’t want to hog your valuable blog space…
    Finally the warmest thank you for all that you continue to do to raise the profile of the need to conquer stroke
    best wishes jon Barrick

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